Printers

Buying printers for home or office

Disabling Cartridge Protection On HP Printers That Use the 61/62 and 63 Cartridges

When trying to use remanufactured ink cartridges with HP 61/62/63 Cartridges, the best solution is to disable Cartridge Protection. If you later wish to verify that a cartridge labeled as a Genuine HP product is actually genuine, you can always re-enable the feature, though I really don’t understand why HP has this feature on their printers. I believe anyone that has a HP printer and buys ink for it knows if they bought a original HP or a remanuractured one. Just my opinion but the only reason I can think of is to discourage the consumer from buying anything but original HP cartridges. What’s your opinion?

The 61/62 and 63 fit 28 Envy printers and 14 Officejet printers so if your not sure where any of the buttons or features are located we recommend you go to your owners manual and locate them for the specific model you have.

If your printer does not have a control panel these instructions will not work, sorry, talk to HP!

Here are the steps.

1. Click the Start button, and click Devices and Printers.

2. Find your HP printer in the list and double-click it to open the Settings page.

3. Click the text for Estimated Ink Levels under the heading of Shopping Resources. This

will open the HP Toolbox window.

(If your computer does not have this option, skip to the alternate method at the end of this post)

4. Click the tab for Cartridge Protection.

5. Click the radio button next to Disable HP Cartridge Protection.

6. Click the Save Setting button to save your new setting. Then, close the window.

7. You may need to remove and reinstall the cartridge for it to be recognized properly.

ALTERNATE METHOD:

Press the wireless button (or menu option Settings/Wireless) to view status. If the

wireless connection is active the wireless light will be solid blue. If wireless is disabled

see user manual for connection instructions. Note the IP address at the top of screen

(example: IP 192.168.1.999) and type this into address field on browser. This will bring

up printers configuration page. On settings tab select HP Cartridge Protection and

choose Disable Cartridge Protection, then click apply. You also need to disable HP

updates to prevent recurrence this will be under web services tab. Select product

updates and choose off and apply.

 

There you have it, fast and simple. Don’t let a HP rep tell you that your printer can’t use remanufactured cartridges, it’s just not true.

Now You Can Buy Remanufactured InkJet Cartridges With Confidence! 

Buy high quality inkjet cartridges Now

The Day The Printer Died!

Can you imagine a day when we no longer have to cut down millions of trees a year so we can produce paper for printing? In my humble opinion that day will come. Back in the late 80’s and early 90s there was a lot of talk about the “paperless office”. The personnel computer was here and we were then introduced to the ink jet and laser printer which could be connected to the computer. What a marvelous invention, gone were the days of the electric type writer and all of the manual corrections that went with that form of printing. Now we could create documents that were easy to correct & save to a computer. But wait, now we could also print just about anything we found on that new platform, the internet. So instead of ushering in the paperless office we created offices that were producing much more printed pages than before.

 

So what happened was simple, when you make something really really easy to use people, will use it more and more. I have no scientific proof for this but I know it to be true. Think about it, before ink jet printers we had the electric typewriter and of course we made mistakes. Mistakes back then were corrected with a thing called whiteout ink or tape. For those of you too young to remember the whiteout ink was in a small bottle with a tiny brush. When you made a mistake you would have to stop, back the paper up in the printer, dab some whiteout on your mistake, blow on it to make sure it was dry, manually turn the paper back to the position of the mistake and start typing again. And then came the next great invention, whiteout on a roll, roll your mistakes away. Even with the fastest typeset this was still slow going. The end result, you only printed what you had to.

 

With the modern ink jet or laser printer we connect it to a computer that has a program installed that lets us type using our computer & keyboard. Making a mistake now means you simply go to the mistake, hit the delete button and retype. Spelling error, no problem, run your spell checker. Want to know how many words in that document, easy, run your program that checks the word count. The boss wants multiply copies, no need for carbon paper anymore, just enter the number of copies you want and presto, out they come on the printer. So what do you think happened to the “paperless office”? It went right down the tubes. People actually printed more, lots more, like crazy more.

 

This was not only limited to the office, when I got into this business in 2004 producing home photo’s was the rage. Kids would also print everything they seen when on line, I actually had mothers tell me their kids were using up all the ink they were buying on this. Not to mention the mothers were printing every recipe they seen and who knows what the fathers were printing, fishing tips maybe. A printing craze ensued.

 

That’s then and now is now. Here’s my point, even though my business Ink & Toner Solutions is in the business of selling ink and toner cartridges for these printers, what I would like to propose is kill your printer. I know you’re sitting there thinking this guy must be crazy, he’s advocating something that would potentially kill his business. That may be but what’s the right thing to do?  CVS did the right thing when they stopped selling cigarettes. They lost millions in revenue, this was one of their biggest profit centers but they made a hard decision and did the right thing. Selling a product that is killing people went completely against what CVS was all about.

 

When I started Ink & Toner Solutions my reason was to sell high quality Eco-friendly ink and toner cartridges that helps to keep them from ending up in the landfills. We do this by reusing the spent printer cartridges and remanufacture them to original specifications. It was my way of contributing to saving our resources and reusing and recycling a product. Well times have changes and there are better ways to save our documents than printing them and saving a hard copy. There are excellent products available to everyone from the individual home owner to a large corporation that will save and store any and all information you can think of.

 

In my next post I’ll go over some of the options out there that just may help you not to print so much and help to save some of those trees.

How to set up a wireless printer

The popularity of wireless printers has greatly increased over the last few years, mostly due to the fact that printers are easy to share and can reside just about anywhere you wish. With the number of mobile devices out there like tablets and smartphones, you now have the power to printer from nearly anywhere, as long as you are in the bounds of your Wi-Fi, of course. Most printers these days are very easy to install and setup, even as a wireless unit, but we have a few tips and tricks to help things run as smooth and as quick as possible.

Getting started
Assuming that you have your wireless network running , the two pieces of information that you will need to start installing a printer are called the SSID or wireless network name, and the password if the network is secured (as they should be). If you need help with finding these items, see “Finding Your SSID and Password” at the bottom of this article.

Location, location, location
The big limiting factor in installing a wireless printer is whether it will be able to receive a wireless signal where you want to put it. What we suggest is take some form of Wi-Fi capable device (many smartphones are great for this task), disconnect from the Wi-Fi network and bring the device to the exact spot you want to keep your printer. If your device can see the wireless network and has a good signal, you are good to go. If the signal is dodgy or non-existent, you may want to either reconsider where you are placing your printer, or you may want to see if you can put the router in a more central location.

 

 

Any large metal objects, including building elements such as girders and even screen doors or windows, will interfere with the wireless signal. Some older buildings like farmhouses may even use materials like chicken wire in the plaster which blocks wireless signals near completely.  Even too many closed doors or walls will degrade the signal. If your wireless signal is weak or intermittent, move the printer closer to your wireless router and avoid obstructions.  If you need to expand your network, there are wireless signal boosters which plug into the wall and act as repeaters, expanding the signal from one end of the office or house to another. If you need help, you can get a hold of our sister company Northampton Computer Repair to help you with a site survey to figure out the best placement for your wireless devices

Few printers need to ever connect to the computer directly (typically only older units with no LCD display on the printer), so most printers can be set up in their final location. If your printers directions indicate the printer needs to be hooked up to the computer first to install the software, you may have to place the printer temporarily near a PC that’s already connected to your home network, so you can continue with the installation.  If you have a laptop, you can bring the computer to your printers location and set it up that way.
In the long term, your placement options are very flexible.

Connecting your printer
Once you have you printer location figured out, it is time to unbox it and set it up. placed Printers with LCD control panels usually let you configure the wireless connection directly from their internal menus. The printer will detect networks within range; you then select your network and enter the password, and you’re good to go.  Many printers allow you to attach the printer to the router via wired connection or “ethernet“, you can configure the wireless using a Web browser. Other older printers may need to be directly connected to a computer via USB cable for the wireless setup as we mentioned before.

Automated Installation (More or Less)
Once you have the printer connected to the network, you can run the disk that came along with the printer on your computer to install the drivers and extra software.  If you don’t want the extras and just want the printer to print without installing more software, see the next step on installing the printer manually.

Manual Installation
Some users want to limit the number of pieces of software they install on their machine.  For those users you can avoid all the extra programs that the automated install includes by manually installing the printer. A note to make things easier: Windows 8, 7 and Vista all ship with many printer drivers. If you encounter problems printing, please download the latest drivers from the vendor and install them before reporting issues. In cases where “certified” Windows 8 and Windows 7 drivers are not available, try using the equivalent Vista drivers.

Windows 8 Logo

If you’re trying to add a network printer at the office, you’ll usually need the name of the printer. If you can’t find it, contact your network administrator.

Open the classic Control Panel (open the Metro Control Panel and scroll to bottom, then click on More settings) and go to Hardware and Sound
Click Add a device or printer.
On the right will be a list of devices you computer has detected on the network.  If it is able to see your printer, it should be listed on this panel.
Select the printer you want to use, and then click Next. (If your computer is connected to a network, only printers listed in Active Directory for your domain are displayed in the list.)

If prompted, install the printer driver on your computer by clicking Install driver. If you’re prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
Complete the additional steps in the wizard, and then click Finish.

win7logo

  1. Start Control Panel Devices and Printers Add Printer  This brings up the Add Printer Wizard
  2. Select Add a network, wireless or Bluetooth printer
  3. Windows will search the network for available printers and list them as they are discovered. If you have the IP address of the printer you want to install, simply double-click on the printer name. If Windows does not have a driver available for the printer, you will be prompted for a driver.
  4. If you just can’t wait, or the printer you are interested in was not listed, you can select “The printer that I want isn’t listed”. This will allow you to specify the IP address of the printer you are trying to install. You should be able to complete the install from this point.
  5. You will be prompted to rename the printer, enable sharing and set the printer as the default system printer. It is recommended that you do not share the printer.
Windows Vista Logo
Windows Vista
  1. Open Printers by clicking the Start button, clicking Control Panel, clicking Hardware and Sound, and then clicking Printers.
  2. Click Add a printer.
  3. In the Add Printer Wizard, select Add a network, wireless or Bluetooth printer.
  4. In the list of available printers, select the one you want to use, and then click Next. If your computer is connected to a network, only printers listed in Active Directory for your domain are displayed in the list.
  5. If prompted, install the printer driver on your computer. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  6. Complete the additional steps in the wizard, and then click Finish.

Windows XP Logo

  1. Go to Start → Control Panel → Printers and Faxes → Add Printer
  2. Make sure the printer is On and Ready, and connected to the network.  Click Next to start the wizard and then select A Network Printer, or Printer Attached to Another Computer. Click Next.
  3. Select Browse for Printer and click Next again. Select the wireless printer you want to install in the list of found printers and click Next. If your printer is not visible in this menu, it may not be connected to the network properly.
  4. A Connect to Printer dialog box will open. If it asks you for a driver, you may need to insert the CD or the printer and find the driver on the disc.  If this is the case, many users may want to opt to exit out of the wizard and just install the drivers and software from the software provided by the printer manufacturer.  Click Yes and finish the wizard.

Finding Your SSID and Password
The easiest way to find your network name and password is through a currently connected laptop or mobile device. In Windows 7, left-click the wireless-connection icon in the system tray. Assuming you’re not inadvertently stealing your neighbor’s bandwidth, the name of the current connection should be your network name. Right-click over the current connection, select Properties, choose the Security tab, check Show characters, and you’ll see your password.

You can also look up the network name and password in the wireless router’s Web configuration pages. Open a browser and type in the IP address of your wireless router into the browser’s address field. You can find the default IP address in the manual, but some of the more common ones are 192.168.1.254 (ATT 2Wire) and 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 (Linksys, Netgear, D-Link, and the like).

Note that the router has a user name and password, as well. If you never changed your router’s user name and password, check the documentation for the default settings or check for your routers default information at RouterPasswords.com.
In some cases the wireless password isn’t shown unfortunately. If you really can’t remember it and no one else knows it, you’ll need to change it and have everyone on the network reconnect with the new password.

Know Your Network, and the Installation Will Follow
Most of the snags that arise when you set up a wireless printer have to do with the wireless network rather than the printer itself. Collect your network’s information ahead of time to avoid getting stuck. Then enjoy sending a print job from your bedroom to the living room — it’s pretty awesome.

 

Is a Printer-Less Office a Possiblity?

I just read a short article in a trade magazine I get, The Recycler, asking the question is a printer-less office a possibility? Back in 1985 when I owned my first business and we bought our first computer and a printer to go with it I heard this same statement. The company that sold us the computer said that within 5 to 10 years at the most, we would be paperless! As he stated, why would you want to buy the paper, print it and then have to file and save it. Now that we have computers, you can just save it to the hard drive and that’s it.

As we all know that did not happen. Why? Industry figure Nathan Dube speculated on the concept of the paperless office in early 2012, noting that it was “a myth for the simple fact that human beings truly have an intense and emotional attachment to the printed page”. Funny, that’s how I felt back in 1985 when I was told we would be going paperless, I had a thing about holding that piece of paper in my hand. Not only that but if you are going over your financials isn’t nice to have paper in hand and a pencil to jot down ideas, notes and anything else you want as you are reading the numbers? Of course you do, try doing that on a computer. Or try telling a CPA that they are not allowed to print a hard copy of financials but will have to save everything to a hard drive or even better “in the cloud” and notice the reaction. I’ve had a number of bookkeepers and CPA’s work for me over the years and not one of them bought into this concept, period. As far as their concerned you have to have a hard copy and save it for 7 years. Yes, they do save to the hard drive and many of them now save off site in the cloud, but not one of them that I have ever met will trust in that alone, print a hard copy is their motto.

Personally, I can think of many instances when I want to print what I have on my computer, like when I’m going through my e-mails in the morning and I see something from a customer that is going to take my attention by having to call him and discuss the issue. I print it out and make whatever notes I feel I will need before calling him. When on the phone I now have that piece of paper to jot down important points that are brought up during the conversation. This seems like a small thing in and of itself but you really can’t do this on the computer, Sure you could copy & paste the email into a word doc and have that window open as you are talking and make notes on the document that way, but it’s just not the same and besides, you can’t doddle with a computer. Sounds silly but again, human nature.

How about when you have a meeting? Sure you could bring you’re laptop to the meeting and you’re document saved in Word and reference that during the meeting. But what about the other people in the meeting? Oh yea, they could have their laptop and reference the same document that you have shared on DropBox. Still leaves the problem of people wanting to take notes as the meeting progresses which is pretty hard to do on a shared document, hell everyone is going to be taking notes and doodling on the same document, this is going to get pretty messy really fast. No, in this situation the best course of action is to print out the meeting notes and pass it out to everyone so they each have a copy and they can make notes as they wish. Save a copy in the cloud, of course. When the meeting is done you can go in, revise the document, everyone can see it and most likely will print it out so that they can follow up on whatever it is that needs to be done.

This is just a few examples that I can think of where I would want that printed piece of paper. I’m sure you can think of situations that you also want a printed piece of paper in front of you. Should we be careful of how much we print? Of course, going green means a lot of things now a day’s, it’s just not CO2 pollution. Saving on paper helps to save our forest and reduces the amount of fossil fuel that is used to produce that piece of paper. Like anything else in life, moderation is key. The day’s of printing any thing and everything just because you can are gone, be careful and only print what you really need. Will we bring this to the point of being a paperless society, I think not.

To be fair there are some companies out there that have saved thousands by attempting to go as paperless as possible. In the court case of Boris Berezovske v Roman Abramovich in Britain by virtue of utilizing cloud computing technology they managed to save five million pages. Not that’s saving a few bucks in the cost of the paper itself, not to mention what it would cost to store this much hard copy material for many years.Granted this is a large case with thousands of dollars that were saved but scale it down and the same system can be used on a much smaller scale. The point is paperless is great for some applications and not good for others.

In the heyday of the printer it was not unusual to find a printer on ever other desk in large offices, this is ridiculous and unnecessary. Many larger companies have done away with this and installed one or two large copiers per floor where everyone prints to those machines. But the point is that they print, why? Because they have to. Even if the company is using The Cloud and discouraging wasteful printing, office workers are still printing but only what they need. Need is the key word here, remember human nature, we like to hold that piece of paper in our hand. I don’t think that will ever change.

So one way to help our environment is to only print what you need to and use the cloud for storing and saving everything you can. Another way you can help save our environment is to use re-manufactured ink and toner. Our specialty at Ink & Toner Solutions is the aftermarket Eco-friendly re-manufactured printer cartridge. If you do use these brands of printer cartridges, you are recycling what would otherwise end up in the landfill. The cost and resources used to make a new printer cartridge is twice that of re-manufacturing what has already been made. If you are interested in trying these high quality cartridges you can order on line at www.inksolutionsma.com.

 

 

What Is Cloud Printing?

Most people know that you can store and retrieve documents from the cloud, but did you know you can have your documents printed via the cloud, also? Thanks to the increased functionality of smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices, these devices have managed to become an important tool for business users. The ability to print documents from these devices is a useful feature that many users would love to have. However, most smartphones and tablets don’t come with any printing system of their own and the ones that do barely support most current printers.

Cloud printing works by giving smartphone and tablet users a way to print important documents from devices that otherwise lack the ability to print. Without any print drivers to worry about, there’s less concern about how to accommodate a multitude of mobile devices or enable support for legacy printers. Business users don’t have to be anywhere near a printer to initiate printing jobs – they can either pick up their documents at a later date or have them printed directly onto a client or associate’s printer for expediency’s sake.
How It Works
Cloud printing is an amazingly straightforward affair that’s being pioneered by efforts like Google Cloud Print. The major search engine giant has been hard at work for years pushing this technology to fruition, leading up to its launch back in late January 2011. Similar to other solutions that are soon to follow, it works on all mobile devices and it utilizes APIs (Application Programming Interfaces, like when you share something on Facebook without being on Facebook’s site) to collect data on custom print options.

The key to this technology’s potential success lies in its simplicity:

  1. Files to be printed are uploaded via an Internet connection onto a cloud computing service that facilitates printing (such as Google Cloud Print).
  2. Using a web-based application, the user initiates a new printing job for documents pushed through that cloud service. A wide assortment of options and special features are available, depending on the API.
  3. The printing job is sent from the cloud service to a cloud aware printer, where the printing job is completed. Non-cloud printers must rely on information sent via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or wired LAN connection to a print server or the printer itself. Jobs can also be sent through a desktop properly connected to a printer.

 

Technical Issues
The technology works best with cloud-aware printers, a new breed of printers that would make it much simpler to print documents directly from cloud share, if they currently existed. In the meantime, users must send their printing jobs through ordinary printers connected to a Wi-Fi connection or an on-location desktop networked to a printer. That means your printer has to be configured correctly for reliable, guaranteed printing.

Some people wonder why business users simply can’t fire off an email and let the recipients on the other end handle the printing. Time is of the essence and every minute counts in intense business situations, so having a quick and sensible solution to common issues is the key to enjoying success. Cloud printing promises to help make it easier and more convenient for business users to get things done even when they’re away from the office.

For an average home user, you can bet this will change our thinking about when we can print something. Haven’t you been somewhere and you find something on your smartphone that you wish you could print so you don’t forget about it? Instead of doing that you’ve waited until you got home instead and looked it up a second time just so you could print it out? Those days may be gone, with this new technology printing anywhere in the world has become a reality.

What Is 3D Printing Any Ways?

What if there was a technological device that, when connected to your computer, could actually print out solid objects? If it sounds like something out of Star Trek – guess again! Although we’re not quite to the level of “Beam me up, Scottie!”, 3D printing is still very much a reality, and has the potential to completely re-shape the world as we know it.

What is 3D printing?

3D Printer For Home Use

If you haven’t ever heard of 3D printing, it’s not surprising. Although the technology has been utilized within industrial settings for over 30 years, 3D printers for consumers and small businesses are just now beginning to take off. In a nutshell, 3D printing is an additive manufacturing technique which is used to build up objects in multiple layers. After one layer is printed and created, it is hardened, another layer is added, and so-forth. The process can take several hours to complete, however, the end result is a tangible 3D object.

What is 3D printing used for?

The most common use of this technology is to create rapid prototypes within the industrial field. These prototypes prove to be very useful for architects, automakers, etc. It is possible, though, for industrial 3D printers to create final products – especially in the case of metal objects. Traditionally, machining of metal componets would start with a piece of metal larger than the finished part. From this material metal would be removed on all surface’s and interiors such as cavity’s and holes. Imagine using a 3D printer that would lay down your part one layer at a time with all holes, cavities, contours and surfaces finished! The savings in time and materials that can be realized are tremendous.

3D Part made using a 3D printer
Engine Block Made Using a 3D Printer

Consumer-oriented 3D printers, on the other hand, are typically used for hobbies and personal interests. This type of 3D printing is more for enjoyment in seeing what you can do with this new technology. Even a small desk top 3D printer will set you back over $2,000 but if you want to be the first guy on the block to have a 3D printer and you love to tinker with new stuff the price could be worth it to you.

What methods are used in 3D printing?

There are several different methods of printing 3D objects to choose from. These options are based upon the material used for printing, the number of colors desired, the preferred resolution, and price. Here are several of the more common techniques used for printing in 3D:

  • Fused deposition modeling – This is the most common method used in 3D printing. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) utilizes a spool of either plastic or metal wire which is melted and placed by the nozzle of the printer. The material will quickly harden before the next layer is added.
  • Inkjet printing – These models are the most similar to the devices that are already used within homes and offices for standard 2D printing. By using special inks (such as resins and binders), an inkjet 3D printer will build up an object through layering. These printers are the only one of their kind that allow for custom coloring.
  • Selective laser sintering – Sintering is a process that is used to create solid objects from powders. With selective laser sintering (SLS), this powder may be in the form of metal, plastic, ceramic, or glass. SLS makes use of a pulsed laser to “draw” a cross-section of the object to be printed. Once the powder fuses, another layer is formed on top. This method is typically used within the industrial sector, as it requires the usage of a powerful laser.
  • Digital light processing – Most often referred to as DLP, this method of printing converts a vat of polymer into a strong solid via exposure to light. By utilizing this method, a very high accuracy and resolution can be achieved. Like SLS, this is generally a method utilized in the industrial field.

What is the future of 3D printing?

It will take some time, but the goal for 3D printing is to change the way the world does business and interacts. One day, the technology may allow us to craft just about anything – from tools to toys and everything in-between. Perhaps in the future we will be able to fax tangible objects, eliminating the need for postal services mail packages. Only time will tell what all this technology can achieve for us, but the future may be closer than you think!

What is Toner?

So what is toner? We get asked that all the time. First off let’s make sure we are all talking about the right kind of toner, what we are not talking about is the cosmetic toner, you know that lotion or wash designed to cleanse the skin and shrink the appearance of pores.

No, the toner we are talking about is what’s inside the toner cartridge you buy for your printer, it’s the actual medium that lets your printer lay down the images and text that you see come out on your paper.

Toner Powder
Microscopic photo of a developer bead coated with toner particles

The toner itself is an electrically-charged powder with two main ingredients: Pigment and Plastic. The role of the pigment is to provide the coloring, black, cyan, magenta or yellow that produces the text and images on the paper. This pigment is blended into plastic particles so that it will melt when it passes through the fuser which gets heated to a high enough temperature to melt these plastic particles.This quality gives toner powder a number of advantages over liquid ink. Using heat to melt the toner onto the medium causes it to firmly bind to almost any type of paper which means the text won’t smudge or bleed easily which is sometimes the case with liquid inks used in ink jet printers.

A replacing toner cartridge containing the toner hopper and drum assembly

This is toner at it’s most basic level which should suffice for this article. Needless to say there is much more in depth explanations that go into the chemical composition and scientific research of toner but that is not the scope of this post, we just want to give a brief overview of what toner powder is and how it works in the printer you use every day.

Each manufacturer spends millions of dollars on R&D and testing in an attempt to make their toner the best on the market. Toner product and the materials that make up the toner is an ever evolving industry. Consumers always want more, for example when toner was first introduced into the market there was only black. Now due to demand we have color laser printers, each toner color had to be invented and researched to produce the desired results. Customers wanted faster print times, that meant the toner had to be changed so it could melt on the paper at faster and faster speeds.

So, how does this toner powder get onto the paper? Well the toner is usally held in what we call the toner hopper which is inside the toner cartridge that you buy. The printer gathers the toner from the hopper with what is called the developer unit.

Printer Developer Unit
A typical Developer Unit

The developer is actually a collection of small, negatively charged magnetic beads. These beads are attached to a rotating metal roller, which moves them throughout the toner in the toner hopper.

Because they are negatively charged, the developer beads collect the positive toner particles as they pass through. The roller then brushes the beads past the drum assembly. The electrostatic image has a stronger negative charge than the developer beads, so the drum pulls the toner particles away.

The drum then moves over the paper, which has an even stronger charge and so grabs the toner.

Printer Drum Unit
Drum Unit

After collecting the toner, the paper is immediately discharged by the detac corona wire. At this point, the only thing keeping the toner on the page is gravity, if you were to blow on the page at this point, you would completely lose the image as the toner would simply blow away. The page must pass through the fuser to affix the toner. The fuser rollers are heated by internal quartz tube lamps, so the plastic in the toner melts as it passes through.

Laser Printer
How a Laser Printer Works

Here’s a simplified schematic of the major parts of a laser printer showing the toner hopper, corona wire, fuser, drum assembly and developer roller. When the paper is grabed from the paper tray it passes through the various parts of the printer at a high rate of speed. This is evident from watching how long it takes from the time you hit print to the time your page comes out complete with text and images. If you pick the page up as soon as it comes out of the printer you can still feel the heat form the fuser that melted the toner onto the paper.

So what is the main advantage of a laser printer Vs a ink jet printer? Speed, precision and economy. A laser can move very quickly, it can print with much greater speed than an ink jet. Laser printers do tend to cost more than ink jet printers but that is offset by the fact that it doesn’t cost as much to keep them running. Toner powder last a long time and still be usable, unlike ink jets that can dry up if you don’t use them. If your looking to print high quality photo’s better to get a high end ink jet, if your looking to print a lot of text documents or even color presentations for office use, get a laser printer.

Let us know what you think of the post, we love to hear from our readers so we can improve and write blogs that our readers want us to write.

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What is the Quality of refilled Ink and Toner Cartridges?

Is the quality of the remanufactured ink and toner printer cartridges being sold out there as good as the OEM (original equipment manufactures) cartridges? That’s kind of like asking if the quality of aftermarket automobile parts are as good as the OEM part. The answer in both cases is it really depends on the manufacturing process’ and the quality control of the remanufacturer to produce a product that meets the quality of the original part. All remanufactured products are not created equal. Continue reading

WILL USING REFILLED INK OR TONER VOID A WARRANTY?

Who has not heard the statement “I was told not to use refilled or remanufactured printer cartridges in my printer because it will void my warranty”. Well, we are here to tell you that is a big fat lie!! Continue reading

Brother Drums

One question we get a lot in our store is “Why do I have a “Drum Near End” error coming up on my Brother printer?”  The drum is the part many printers that applies the toner to the paper, so it plays a very important part in the printing process.  This error comes up whenever the counter in the Brother printer nears the end of the drum’s useful lifespan. This information is for Brother printers in the DCP, HL and MFC series primarily. Continue reading